• Redress the arts education deficit in Northern Ireland
    Northern Ireland has always been treated as second class in terms of Funding to the Arts in comparison with the other nations in these Islands. That treatment extends to Drama School education in that Northern Ireland is the only part of the UK and Ireland with no publicly funded independent Drama School or accredited institution for Actors, Stage Management and Directors. As a Union, Equity is behind the campaign to put that deficit to rights by asking members to sign up to a petition for a fully funded Drama School, financed by the Department of Education and Learning through the Stormont Assembly and other sources, to create a centre of excellence for performers and others working in Theatre Film and Television. Please sign the petition.
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  • BMW play fair by British workers – no pensions robbery
    BMW group is seeking to rob its UK workers of their hard earned retirement income by closing their final salary pension scheme. The proposed closure of the defined benefit pension scheme by 31 May 2017 could result in car workers making the iconic Mini and Rolls-Royce motor cars losing as much as £140,000 over the course of their retirement. BMW’s UK workforce is world class making over 260,000 Minis and record numbers of Rolls Royce motor cars in the last year. Their hard work and efficiency has contributed hugely to BMW’s record breaking profits of approximately £6 billion, enabling the carmaker to lavish nearly £2 billion of dividends on shareholders. Yet BMW wants to reward this hard work by back tracking on past pension promises. This is deferred pay, money which BMW’s UK workforce has worked hard for to provide for a decent income on retirement for themselves and their families. With more and more highly profitable companies pleading poverty and looking to duck their pension promises, BMW workers are saying enough is enough.
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  • Tips are for staff not employers
    What do celebrity chef, Michel Roux Jr, Harrods and the Queen’s Grocer Fortnum and Mason have in common? They have all (in the last few months) been caught with their hands in the tips’ jar, a full 18 months after the government vowed to stamp out similar rip off tip scams. The three iconic establishments were revealed to be pocketing some or all of the service charge, rather than giving staff a fair share, often without customers’ knowledge. Now celebrity haunts the Ivy - where dinner for two costs at least £200 - has been exposed for giving staff just £1.30 per hour of the 12.5 per cent service charge it automatically adds to bills to its minimum waged staff. Unite members working in the UK hospitality industry are fed up of waiting for their fair tips. Diners want to know that the service charge or non-cash tip they have just paid is going to the low paid staff that served them and is not being pocketed by the company to do what they like with. After an eight-month review into tipping abuses, the government said: ‘Tips should go to workers, not employers’, so why are waiters and kitchen staff still waiting? It’s time for the government to close the legal loophole which allows employers to treat non-cash tips and service charges as restaurant revenue without any legal obligation to pass it on to staff. We are calling on the government to publish the recommendations of its consultation on tipping, gratuities, cover and service charges which closed on the 26 June 2016, and: - Make the code mandatory – the 2009 voluntary code of best practice has utterly failed to bring greater transparency and fairness to tipping. Employers can no longer be trusted to police their tipping policies. Clear and mandatory rules around tipping and the distribution of tips are needed to stamp out rip off tip and service charge scams. - Ban bogus tronc schemes –Too many employers are using tronc schemes to pool and distribute non-cash tips and service charges which are not genuinely independent from management interference. The government needs to get behind and support the jointly endorsed (Unite/AMLR Association of Licensed Multiple Retailers) guidelines to stamp out bogus troncs. - Give staff 100% ownership rights over tips with a say in how they are shared out. - Ban employers from using non-cash tips and service charges to cover breakages, till shortages, admin fees, and customers doing a runner.
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  • Ritzy Picturehouse, pay your staff a Living Wage!
    Loving films and working in a cinema should not mean living on poverty wages. But that’s how it goes for the staff at the Ritzy. Kevin has worked at the Ritzy for six years. Like many of his colleagues, he loves helping to bring great films to the community. What he doesn’t love is the gritty reality of his poverty wages, particularly as he and his partner have just brought a child into the world and have been pushed out of their house by a demanding landlord. The paternity pay he received and the low rate of his wage are nowhere near enough to support a child comfortably. Enter the scene Mooky Greidinger. Mooky is the CEO of Cineworld, the corporation behind your local Picturehouse cinemas. Mooky earned £1.2 million in 2015 - which equates to £575 per hour - and the post-tax profit of the company stood at £83.8 million. Kevin and his colleagues are merely asking for £9.75 per hour! The Ritzy Picturehouse thrives when Brixton thrives. Mooky knows film lovers and Picturehouse members don’t want to see Kevin and the staff at the Ritzy cinema exploited. That’s why pressure from the customers works. When the community and the staff come together, we win! The campaign began in 2007 by Ritzy workers and their union BECTU (the Ritzy being the only Picturehouse cinema with recognition for their chosen union). Our aim was to raise ourselves off the minimum wage, and we won with the help and support from the local community. Seven years later, in 2014, we returned with 13 high-profile strikes pushing for the London Living Wage. When the workers, our union, and the community came together, we managed to win a 26% pay rise in increments over two years and an agreement to return to negotiations towards the Living Wage in June 2016. In that meeting last year, Picturehouse and Cineworld representatives backtracked on the agreement and refused to negotiate on any points in the workers’ pay claim. These include: - The London Living Wage - Company sick pay for all staff - Company maternity/paternity pay for all staff - Fair pay rises for different job roles The BECTU sector of Prospect is our chosen union and is the chosen union of workers at other Picturehouse sites. However, Picturehouse and Cineworld are working very hard to hinder BECTU’s presence at other sites. Other independent cinemas can afford to pay the Living Wage with Curzon Cinemas (where the BECTU sector of Prospect is also the recognised union for all its workers). Curzon recently implemented the Living Wage and the London Living Wage at all their cinemas both in London and across the UK. What we are asking for isn't unreasonable. Everyone deserves a real Living Wage and the right to representation by a union of their choice at their workplace. But we need your help to make this a reality. Please back the campaign by signing this petition.
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  • Picturehouse Central, pay your staff a Living Wage!
    Loving films and working in a cinema should not mean living on poverty wages. But that’s how it goes for the staff at the Ritzy. Kevin has worked at the Ritzy for 6 years. Like many of his colleagues, he loves helping to bring great film to the community. What he doesn’t love is the gritty reality of his poverty wages, particularly as he and his partner have just brought a child into the world and have been pushed out of their house by a demanding landlord. The paternity pay he received and the low rate of his wage are nowhere near enough to support a child comfortably. Enter the scene Mooky Greidinger. Mooky is the CEO of Cineworld, the corporation behind your local Picturehouse cinemas. Mooky earned £1.2 million in 2015 - which equates to £575 per hour - and the post-tax profit of the company stood at £83.8 million. Kevin and his colleagues are merely asking for £9.75 per hour! The Picturehouse Central thrives when London thrives. Mooky knows film lovers and Picturehouse members don’t want to see Kevin and the staff at the Ritzy cinema exploited. That’s why pressure from the customers works. When the community and the staff come together we win! The campaign began in 2007 by Ritzy workers and their union BECTU (the Ritzy being the only Picturehouse cinema with recognition for their chosen union). Our aim was to raise ourselves off the minimum wage, and we won with the help and support from the local community. Seven years later, in 2014, we returned with 13 high-profile strikes pushing for the London Living Wage. When the workers, our union, and the community came together, we managed to win a 26% pay rise in increments over two years and an agreement to return to negotiations towards the Living Wage in June 2016. In that meeting last year, Picturehouse and Cineworld representatives backtracked on the agreement and refused to negotiate on any points in the workers’ pay claim. These include: - The London Living Wage - Company sick pay for all staff - Company maternity/paternity pay for all staff - Fair pay rises for different job roles The BECTU sector of Prospect is our chosen union and is the chosen union of workers at other Picturehouse sites. However, Picturehouse and Cineworld are working very hard to hinder BECTU’s presence at other sites. Other independent cinemas can afford to pay the Living Wage with Curzon Cinemas (where the BECTU sector of Prospect is also the recognised union for all its workers). Curzon recently implemented the Living Wage and the London Living Wage at all their cinemas both in London and across the UK. What we are asking for isn't unreasonable. Everyone deserves a real Living Wage and the right to representation by a union of their choice at their workplace. But we need your help to make this a reality. Please back the campaign by signing this petition.
    950 of 1,000 Signatures
  • Crouch End Picturehouse, pay your staff a Living Wage!
    Loving films and working in a cinema should not mean living on poverty wages. But that’s how it goes for the staff at Crouch End Picturehouse. Mark has worked at Crouch End Picturehouse since it opened, while he and his partner Philippa have both worked in Picturehouse cinemas for over five years. They enjoy their jobs and the opportunity it allows them to work flexibly in the creative industry, but not the stress and long hours they have to work because Picturehouse pay wages below the level needed to live in London. If they are unwell they often have to make a choice between going to work ill or losing a day's pay. They would like to have a child but worry about the loss of income because the company only offer statutory maternity and paternity pay. Enter the scene: Mooky Greidinger. Mooky is the CEO of Cineworld, the corporation behind your local Picturehouse cinemas. Mooky earned £1.2 million in 2015 - which equates to £575 per hour - and the post-tax profit of the company stood at £83.8 million. Mark and his colleagues are merely asking for £9.75 per hour. The Crouch End Picturehouse thrives when Crouch End thrives. Mooky knows film lovers and Picturehouse members don’t want to see Mark and the staff at the Ritzy cinema exploited. That’s why pressure from customers works. When the community and the staff come together, we win. The campaign began in 2007 by Ritzy workers and their union BECTU (the Ritzy being the only Picturehouse cinema with recognition for their chosen union). Our aim was to raise ourselves off the minimum wage, and we won with the help and support from the local community. Seven years later, in 2014, we returned with 13 high-profile strikes pushing for the London Living Wage. When the workers, our union, and the community came together, we managed to win a 26% pay rise in increments over two years and an agreement to return to negotiations towards the Living Wage in June 2016. In that meeting last year, Picturehouse and Cineworld representatives backtracked on the agreement and refused to negotiate on any points in the workers’ pay claim. These include: - The London Living Wage - Company sick pay for all staff - Company maternity/paternity pay for all staff - Fair pay rises for different job roles The BECTU sector of Prospect is our chosen union and is the chosen union of workers at other Picturehouse sites. However, Picturehouse and Cineworld are working very hard to hinder BECTU’s presence at other sites. Other independent cinemas can afford to pay the Living Wage with Curzon Cinemas (where the BECTU sector of Prospect is also the recognised union for all its workers). Curzon recently implemented the Living Wage and the London Living Wage at all their cinemas both in London and across the UK. What we are asking for isn't unreasonable. Everyone deserves a real Living Wage and the right to representation by a union of their choice at their workplace. But we need your help to make this a reality. Please back the campaign by signing this petition.
    893 of 1,000 Signatures
  • Hackney Picturehouse, pay your staff a Living Wage!
    Loving films and working in a cinema should not mean living on poverty wages. But that’s how it goes for the staff at Hackney Picturehouse. One of our colleague Kevin has worked at the Ritzy for 6 years. Like many of his colleagues, he loves helping to bring great film to the community. What he doesn’t love is the gritty reality of his poverty wages, particularly as he and his partner have just brought a child into the world and have been pushed out of their house by a demanding landlord. The paternity pay he received, and the low rate of his wage, are nowhere near enough to support a child comfortably. Enter the scene: Mooky Greidinger. Mooky is the CEO of Cineworld, the corporation behind your local Picturehouse cinemas. Mooky earned £1.2 million in 2015 - which equates to £575 per hour - and the post-tax profit of the company stood at £83.8 million. Kevin and his colleagues are merely asking for £9.75 per hour. The Hackney Picturehouse thrives when Hackney thrives. Mooky knows film lovers and Picturehouse members don’t want to see Kevin and the staff at the Ritzy cinema exploited. That’s why pressure from customers works. When the community and the staff come together, we win. The campaign began in 2007 by Ritzy workers and their union BECTU (the Ritzy being the only Picturehouse cinema with recognition for their chosen union). Our aim was to raise ourselves off the minimum wage, and we won with the help and support from the local community. Seven years later, in 2014, we returned with 13 high-profile strikes pushing for the London Living Wage. When the workers, our union, and the community came together, we managed to win a 26% pay rise in increments over two years and an agreement to return to negotiations towards the Living Wage in June 2016. In that meeting last year, Picturehouse and Cineworld representatives backtracked on the agreement and refused to negotiate on any points in the workers’ pay claim. These include: - The London Living Wage - Company sick pay for all staff - Company maternity/paternity pay for all staff - Fair pay rises for different job roles The BECTU sector of Prospect is our chosen union and is the chosen union of workers at other Picturehouse sites. However, Picturehouse and Cineworld are working very hard to hinder BECTU’s presence at other sites. Other independent cinemas can afford to pay the Living Wage with Curzon Cinemas (where the BECTU sector of Prospect is also the recognised union for all its workers). Curzon recently implemented the Living Wage and the London Living Wage at all their cinemas both in London and across the UK. What we are asking for isn't unreasonable. Everyone deserves a real Living Wage and the right to representation by a union of their choice at their workplace. But we need your help to make this a reality. Please back the campaign by signing this petition.
    285 of 300 Signatures
  • Southern Fail: Time for action on Southern Rail
    Had enough of paying more but getting less from Southern Rail? Southern Rail, run by Govia Thameslink Railways, is a franchising failure with trains often delayed, cancelled and overcrowded. Despite these failures, Southern still received £42m in net subsidies from the taxpayer in 2014-15 and paid out £22m in shareholder dividends. It’s a rip-off and Southern should be stripped of the franchise. While fares are going up - Southern is proposing to close more ticket offices, remove guards from trains and extend driver only operations. It will be even more difficult to get help when we need it, and this isn’t putting passengers’ safety first. Southern illustrates the failures of rail privatisation – with profits put before people. The UK government is hostile to public ownership, but Govia is part-owned by French State railways, SNCF. The Southern Rail franchise should be returned to public ownership. We know this can work. Publicly owned East Coast returned over £1bn to the Treasury, had high satisfaction ratings and won over 30 industry awards. Please take action – sign our petition to Chris Grayling MP, Secretary of State for Transport calling on him to strip Govia of the Southern Rail franchise.
    1,135 of 2,000 Signatures
  • Fully Fund our NHS
    Our NHS faces the biggest financial crisis in a generation. Across the country, our NHS and social care services are facing financial crises as a result of an unprecedented squeeze on funding that is set to last until 2020 at the earliest. Despite the best efforts of NHS staff this is beginning to affect patient care. From waiting lists to A&E, from cancer treatment to ambulance call out times, things have got progressively worse over the last 5 years. Leaked evidence from the new NHS Sustainability and Transformation Plans hints that local closures and service rationing will result as the NHS struggles to find billions in savings imposed by the government’s funding squeeze. The NHS needs to change. We need a more joined up service for patients from GP surgeries to hospitals through to community and mental healthcare. But this cannot happen on the cheap. The NHS needs proper funding to enable it to meet the demands of our growing and changing population. And this is affordable. If we invested as much per head of population on our health services as France, Germany or the Netherlands, it would raise billions in additional funding that could make a genuine difference. Ask the Chancellor to fully fund our NHS.
    11,965 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by NHS Support Federation Picture
  • Philip Green: Honour your BHS pensions pledge
    In an interview with ITV News, the billionaire former owner of BHS said he was "very, very, very sorry" for the company’s collapse. But the Pensions Regulator has "yet to receive a comprehensive written proposal" from Philip Green about a settlement for the BHS pension fund, which faces a deficit of £571m. Most of that deficit was built up under his 15 years at the helm. He consistently underfunded the pension scheme -- while paying his wife £400 million in BHS dividends, channeled through Monaco’s low-tax regime. Parliament has now voted for him to be stripped of his knighthood, but it's possible that despite investigations by the Work and Pensions Committee and campaigning MPs, that losing his "Sir" may be the extent of his punishment, along with some small financial contributions that still leave employees heavily out of pocket. Usdaw has called on Philip Green to honour his pension promise and ‘sort’ the pension scheme. We had hoped this would take weeks rather than the months that have already passed. Now BHS pensioners it might be years before they see a result. He has claimed to ‘have been working on this issue on a daily basis’, but we have seen precious little progress so far. Usdaw members in BHS were left devastated and jobless by the collapse of a company. 11,000 hard-working and loyal staff totally let down by the actions of a handful of people at the top. Those jobs have tragically gone. Now workers could also lose great chunks of their retirement savings. Current and future BHS pensioners need to have their futures secured. Let’s stand with BHS workers and tell Phillip Green we need to see real action, and now.
    107,823 of 200,000 Signatures
  • Uber UK: Stop driving down workers' rights
    19 Uber drivers, with the backing of their union GMB, have won a landmark case against the app-enabled taxi firm, who have refused to give drivers basic employment rights. Uber have announced they will appeal the decision however, so this fight looks to have a long (and costly) way yet to go. This legal case has exposed the dark side of the so called 'gig economy'. For many the gig economy is a rigged economy, where bosses weasel out of paying living wages. Or providing basics like paid holiday time. If you are a ‘self-employed’ driver at Uber you are virtually a slave to app. Miss a job alert and you can be “deactivated” without appeal. Fail to keep up your rating and you can be cast aside at any moment. “I guarantee you one thing, Uber don’t see drivers as humans.” Driver Ruman Miah told the Guardian. Being kept on a leash of a self-serving app is not most people’s definition of self-employment. Genuinely self-employed contractors can refuse jobs, set their own hours and sub-contract work to others. But if you work for Uber you enjoy none of the freedoms of self-employment, and none of the security of regular employment - both ways you lose. It’s not surprising that many feel powerless and unable to speak out. Whilst Uber are denying workers some basic employment rights, they’re also ducking these drivers’ National Insurance contributions. It’s taking millions of pounds from the Exchequer, but it also means drivers lose access to many important benefits if they need them. Technological change should be a force for good. But increasingly it is being used to control and exploit workforces, and cheat them out of decent wages. Uber can’t have it both ways. They should accept the tribunal verdict, drop the appeal, and either give their workers decent employment rights, or give them the freedoms of genuine self-employment.
    7,286 of 8,000 Signatures
    Created by GMB Campaigns
  • Don't cut a single workers' right when making new UK laws
    Many vital rights at work in the UK are derived from EU law, guaranteeing things like paid leave entitlements, protections from being forced to work excessive hours, discrimination protections and rights for working mums to be. Following the UK vote to leave the European Union, Parliament will decide what happens to these rights. Prominent leave campaigners have called for a halving of regulations derived from EU law, or flexibility in interpreting rights, claiming that British business would benefit from a reduction in "red tape". What they call "red tape" is really rights and protections that are valued by millions of working people. Attempts to cut these rights, or to limit the range of workers they apply to (for example exempting staff of small businesses or temporary workers), would cause great harm to fairness at work and to working people's living standards. Bad bosses would waste no time in taking advantage, and over time we would all lose, as business joins in a race to the bottom. We need to keep a close focus on our MPs as they start to debate what happens to our rights at work, and hold them to account, whether they backed leave or remain.
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    Created by TUC Campaigns Picture